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Advanced Addictions: From Theory to Practice

Advanced Addictions: From Theory to Practice

Richmont is opening a portion of this course to Richmont alumni and the surrounding community for Continuing Education Credit. Please note that this is only a portion of an entire course offered for a reduced fee. If you are interested in auditing or taking the entire course for course credit, please contact our registrar. This event is not sponsored by the alumni association and does not fall under the benefits of founding membership status.

When: Saturday, September 8, 2018, 8:30-5:00PM

Where: Richmont Graduate University / Atlanta Campus / 1900 The Exchange SE, Bldg. 100, Atlanta, GA 30339

Continuing Education: 7 CE Clock Hours Awarded. No partial credit awarded.

Fees: Regular Rate (Alumni/Community): $160

Reduced Rate (Alumni/Community): $150 when you register through Richmont’s NEW App! Search for “Richmont” on both Android and Apple app stores.

Presented by

Lee A. Underwood, Psy.D. currently serves as Professor in the Counseling Department at Regent University, School of Psychology and Counseling. He is the former Director of the Center for Addiction and Offender Research at Regent University. Dr. Underwood provides program evaluation, training consultation activities, substance abuse, psychological and psychosexual evaluations for private entities, human services and juvenile justice throughout the country. Dr. Underwood has served as an Executive Clinical Officer for several large residential treatment, juvenile justice and criminal justice programs for adolescents and adults with mental, substance use, trauma, and disruptive behavioral and sexual disorders.  Dr. Underwood is a nationally recognized Licensed Clinical Psychologist in several states and Certified Sex Offender Treatment Provider (CSOTP). Dr. Underwood has been recognized by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), American Institutes for Research (AIR) and the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) as one of the leading program innovators for community based treatment programs. Dr. Underwood has held a number of policy-oriented research, academic, clinical and consulting positions over his career with federal, state and private agencies for research, program design, development, implementation and evaluation of services. Dr. Underwood has over 18 years of university teaching in psychology and counselor preparation programs. He has authored over 75 refereed journal articles, 17 treatment manuals, books and technical reports on mental health, substance use, trauma needs of females, sex offending, forensic, spiritual and cultural needs of adolescents. His most recent books include Counseling Adolescents Competently (Sage Publishing) and Adolescents in Conflict (Taylor Made Publishing). His work was featured as the most downloaded articles published in Routledge Behavioral Sciences journals in 2014.

Topic

This training provides participants with an advanced understanding of the role of providers in the delivery of services for those struggling with addictions. From an introductory level of defining addictions, this training provides an advanced understanding of case conceptualization principles in the delivery of assessment and intervention services. Participants will gain awareness of the relationship between relapse prevention, motivational interviewing and engagement processes. A focus on the opioid epidemic will be presented with support for effective treatment interventions. Participants will be exposed to case scenarios and will work through impasses and solutions in the delivery of chemical and process related addictions.

Learning Objectives

Within the context of this 7 hour workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe relationship between chemical and process addictions
  • Utilize motivational interviewing and engagement skills
  • Describe the impact of opiates in the addiction process
  • Recognize the difference between abstinence and harm-reduction theory
  • Practice case conceptualization skills in the application of diagnoses and treatment interventions.

Schedule of the Day

Introduction, Assumptions & Biases

Exercise #1: Drawbridge Exercise

Critical Questions in the Assessment & Treatment Process

Biological Bases for Addictions

Trauma, Attachment & Learned Helplessness

Case Study #1

Opioid Addiction & Management

Process  & Behavioral Addictions

Case Study #2

Resilience, Motivation & Relapse Prevention

Exercise #2 Practice Resilience & Related Tools

Closing Remarks / Final Evaluations   

Continuing Education

7 NBCC CE Clock Hours Awarded

7 CE Hours Awarded to Psychologists

Partial attendance is not awarded.

Target Audience

This is an intermediate level training for clinical professionals.

Registration

Click HERE!

Refunds

Refunds must be requested prior to September 3, 2018.

For questions concerning registration or Continuing Education, please contact Martha Busby at mbusby@richmont.edu.

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Richmont Graduate University is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. 

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychologist Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

 

Eating Disorders in Adults & Adolescents: An introduction to Assessment, Diagnosis, and Intervention

Eating Disorders in Adults & Adolescents: An introduction to Assessment, Diagnosis, and Intervention

June 1, 2018

9:00AM-4:30PM

Richmont Graduate University

1900 The Exchange SE, Bldg. 100, Atlanta, GA 30339

Presented by

Crystal Marie Burwell, PhD, LPC, NCC is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) and owner of Enchanted Therapeutic Counseling Services (ETCS). Crystal is a native of Raleigh, North Carolina, where she received her doctorate from North Carolina State University (NCSU). Crystal is a member of the original NBCC MFP fellowship. She has a passion for helping people live authentic lives and focuses on wellness and positive psychology. Her clinical specialties include eating disorders, substance abuse, mood and anxiety disorders. She has a new focus on bariatric care and will be launching binge eating and bariatric groups beginning November 2018. Lastly, Crystal teaches graduate counselor education courses at Messiah College and Richmont Graduate University and is a member of the editorial review board for The Professional Counselor (TPC).

Topic

This presentation will focus on understanding the basis of eating disorder behavior in adolescents and adults. Learn more about the DSM V changes in eating disorder diagnosis and treatment. Also, learn about medical complications and effects of disordered eating. Stay up to date with trending Eating Disorder treatment and resources for providers and educators.

Level of Audience: Beginner

Learning Objectives

Within the context of this 6 hour workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss recent changes to the DSM-V
  • Critique issues surrounding feeding and eating disorders via case studies/evidenced based research
  • Utilize knowledge regarding medical complications in adults and adolescents via problem solving treatment planning to provide comprehensive care
  • Discuss insurance challenges with treating eating disorders and brainstorm action goals via lobbying power
  • Apply knowledge of cultural diversity using the ADDRESSING model to determine cultural implications when working with eating disorder clients

Registration Information: Register HERE!

Fees

Regular Rate (Alumni/Community): $135

Reduced Rate (Alumni/Community): $125 when you register through Richmont’s NEW App! Search for “Richmont” on both Android and Apple app stores.

Continuing Education

6 NBCC CE Clock Hours Awarded

6 CE Hours Awarded to Psychologists

Partial attendance is not awarded.

For questions concerning registration or Continuing Education, please contact Martha Busby at mbusby@richmont.edu.

Refunds: In order to receive a full refund, requests must be made prior to May 28.

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Richmont Graduate University is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. 

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychologist Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

 

Social & Cultural Diversity Ethics: Justice for All?

Social & Cultural Diversity Ethics: Justice for All?

Issues and Ethics in the Helping Professions

Friday, July 13, 2018

Richmont Graduate University

1900 The Exchange, Building 100, Atlanta, GA 30339

9:00am – 4:30pm

Presented by

Sonja A. Sutherland, Ph.D. LPC, NCC, CPCS, DCC

Dr. Sutherland is an Assistant Professor of Counseling and Director of Institutional Effectiveness at Richmont Graduate University in Atlanta, Georgia. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the state of Georgia, an NBCC Distance Credentialed Counselor (DCC), an NBCC Approved Counselor Supervisor (ACS), and a Certified Compassion Fatigue Therapist and Trainer. Dr. Sutherland is also the Founder and CEO of The Legacy Consortium, Inc (TLC), Executive Director of the Legacy Changers Counseling Centers, a division of the TLC, and also hosts a local Atlanta radio show focusing on family relationships and mental wellness. In the field of counseling since 1998, and licensed since 2001, Dr. Sutherland has provided therapeutic services in the private practice, psychiatric residential, in-home, and outpatient mental health settings, for adolescents and adults, through individual, group, couples, and family therapy. Dr. Sutherland has specialized in working with adolescents and families for the last 15 years. During the last decade Dr. Sutherland has also served as a Director of Mental Health and Clinical Services for mid – large sized outpatient mental health organizations providing therapeutic intervention in the Cobb, Atlanta, and Stone Mountain areas. Dr. Sutherland’s areas of research interest include counselor supervision & cultural competence development, and evidence-based treatment & residential models of care for at-risk adolescents (commercially sexually exploited youth, family relationship restoration, and integration of spirituality in treatment).

Course Description:

How should clinicians respond when confronted with ethical dilemmas in the field? How are the ethical codes best used for guiding and informing decisions? When separate culturally diverse groups’ attempts to protect their rights, results in a conflict of interest (i.e. for the rights of one group to be upheld, the rights of the second group must be compromised), how should clinicians address the subsequent ethical questions regarding one form of diversity taking priority/supremacy over another form of diversity? How can spiritual/religious diversity and sexual diversity co-exist and be treated respectfully (even when not always in agreement)? How can clinicians determine answers to questions surrounding beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice in our interactions with all individuals regardless of race, religion, sexual orientation and gender? Some of the biggest issues facing clinicians surround ethical practice. Knowing the codes is not enough. Many times we are put in such complex positions with clients that decision-making can provoke varying levels of anxiety. A highly interactive group format and thought-provoking case vignettes will challenge clinicians to think through diversity-related ethical dilemmas that are occurring in the field today. Related sections of the 2014 ACA Codes of Ethics will be incorporated.

Course Objectives: Within the context of this 6 hour workshop, participants will:

  • Define cultural diversity
  • Develop and demonstrate cultural self-and-other awareness
  • List components involved in worldview development
  • Apply understanding of worldview development to clinical case conceptualization
  • List ethical considerations for working with culturally diverse clients
  • Explain use of ethical decision-making models in working with culturally diverse others.
  • List and discuss components of multicultural counseling and social justice counseling and apply using case vignettes

Target audience: Psychologists, Counselors, Marriage & Family Therapists

Basic Schedule:

 

9am – 10:30am

  • Defining cultural diversity and promoting of cultural self-and-other awareness
  • Respecting diversity despite value differences
10:30am – 10:45am Break
10:45am – 12:15pm
  • Providing services to diverse others
  • Ethical considerations for working with culturally diverse clients (race, religion, sexual orientation and gender)
12:15pm – 1:15pm Lunch
1:15pm – 2:45pm
  • Case vignettes based on current diversity related conflicts towards assessing and clarifying how various combinations of factors can arise creating complex ethical situations
2:45 – 3:00pm Break
3:00pm – 4:30pm
  • Practice use of the ACA Codes of Ethics, along with an evidence-based decision-making model towards demonstrating beneficent and justice-driven applications of ethical guidelines in counseling.

Continuing Education: Six ethics CE clock hours awarded.

Fees:

  • Richmont Graduate University Legacy and Founding Alumni Association Members, Hope/Henegar Supervisors, Faculty, & Staff: FREE
  • Richmont Students: $25.00
  • Basic Alumni Association Members: $50.00
  • Nonmembers/Friends of Alumni: $125.00
  • Have Lunch with us on campus! Lunch includes sandwich, chips, cookie, and drink. $8.00 (optional)

Registration: Click Here

For questions, please contact Martha Busby at mbusby@richmont.edu.
Refunds will only be issued if requested prior to July 9..

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identifited. RGU is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.  

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Should You Become A Counselor?

Think back. What was it that drew you to pursue becoming a counselor? Every counselor’s experience of being called to the profession looks different. For some, it’s a love for hearing people’s stories, it’s a conversation with a friend or professor, it’s a sense of how helpful talking to another person can be. For others, it’s connected to your own experience in counseling or working through a difficult season. Some start down the path fresh out of undergraduate school, others may be seeking a new chapter that has greater meaning and purpose, one that can bring hope and healing to people’s lives. A strong sense of calling happens in all the experiences in between.

Maybe you have a strong sense of what inspired your vision to become a counselor, or maybe it’s something that’s been there all along, a knack for seeing and grasping underlying narratives. Or maybe you’re not even sure what counseling is, you just know you want to help people.

Tom Sanders, Director of Admissions at Richmont Graduate University, provides a nuanced understanding of counseling that goes beyond a vague sense of counseling as problem solving. He says, “People are hurting, and their hurt is more than having a lack of things. It’s an internal deficit that people experience, and sometimes counseling is pouring back into that deficit or helping them realize that their deficit is not crushing.” When there are no clear answers, counseling is reminding people of God’s purpose in the pains of life.

Counseling is a unique profession that privileges you to enter into the sacred spaces of people’s intimate lives and deep places of pain. These spaces are not worksites for repair, but spaces for sitting, perceiving, and understanding both the intertwined vibrancy and trauma of people’s’ lives that they themselves may not realize. Counseling draws others into awareness, working towards healthy communities through relationship building. At its most basic level, counseling is sitting with people through hard times.

In the same way that counseling is unique, counselors themselves offer their own unique narratives as connecting points to people who have experienced similar stories. Not every counselor will have a warm and empathetic, extroverted personality, though these are good qualities. Counselors, in reality, are a diverse group of people with diverse experiences who counsel diverse clients. Good counselors tend to be people who have experienced healing of their own. In Sanders’ words, “It’s encouraging to see the redemptive story—there is a redemption in understanding your own brokenness and using that to understand others who are in a similar places.” Counselors realize that they have stories too, and that their vulnerability could help others realize they’re not alone in losing a child or going through a divorce or suffering from addiction.

A counselor’s career is fundamentally relational. It requires the ability to listen with empathy paired in tension with the ability to help articulate their own story. Counseling is giving. It is giving time, attention, and service to people in vulnerable moments of their life. It is its own reward as you watch God use you as an agent of healing and transformation in people’s lives.

The first step in the journey to becoming a counselor is getting trained. At Richmont, we provide Christ-centered education to help people become agents of transformation and healing. Take the next step in the journey to becoming a counselor today. Attend a preview day or visit our admissions page.

Green Cross: Grief & Loss

Green Cross: Grief & Loss

 This event is not sponsored by the alumni association and does not fall under the benefits of founding membership status.

When: September 29, 2018, 8:30am- 5:00pm (lunch on your own)

Where: Richmont Graduate University, 1900 The Exchange SE, Building 100, Atlanta, GA 30339

Continuing Education: 6 NBCC-approved CE Clock hours Awarded. 6 CE Hours Awarded to Psychologists. No partial credit awarded.

Fee: Students: $80

Professionals: $120

Presented by

Dr. Vanessa Snyder is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Certified Sex Therapist, Certified Traumatologist, and AAMFT Approved Supervisor. She is a 2008 graduate as well as the VP of the Institute of Trauma and Recovery and the Dean of Clinical Affairs at Richmont Graduate University. She received her PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision from Regent University in VA. Her areas of research interests include: trauma in families, sexual abuse and trauma, trauma treatment with play/art therapy, assessment in treatment of adults who experience trauma/complex trauma, secondary traumatic stress, complex trauma model protocol used for human trafficking and dissociative disorders.

Topic: 

This workshop concentrates on the differences between Grief and Loss, The different types of loss, various ways we grieve, and how to respond well to those who have experienced a recent loss. The course covers both theory and practical skills in responding to those who have gone through a loss and the grief that they may be experiencing as a result.

Learning Objectives: As a result of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  •  Identify and understand the changes, losses and transitions of bereavement.
  • Apply and utilize strategies of loss when working with First Responders and survivors in a crisis or disaster.
  • Describe the biopsychosocial and spiritual components to grief.
  • Assess the effects of grief on the family system.
  • Demonstrate understanding of developmental and cultural differences that shape the bereavement process.
  • Apply and use specific skills in helping survivors to being the process of grieving and to facilitate positive movement and outcomes.
  • Assess and synthesize various models of intervention having to do with grief and loss when working First Responders and survivors in field situations of disaster/trauma.

Registration: Click HERE

Please direct your questions regarding registration to Martha Busby at mbusby@richmont.edu.

Refunds: In order to receive a full refund, requests must be submitted prior to September 24, 2018.

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Richmont Graduate University is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. 

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychologist Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Green CrossAPA Sponsor Low Res                                                                                                                                NBCC Logo2 2011

Three Emotionally Healthy Ways to Navigate Relationships

Relationships are tricky. Feelings can be complicated.

Arguments and emotional turmoil can be the result of miscommunication and a lack of self-awareness. A lack of connectedness with oneself and others is often to blame.

Dr. Tyler Rogers is an assistant professor of counseling at Richmont Graduate University. He has a Ph.D. in Counselor Education from the University of Mississippi where he explored, “The relationships between advocacy competency, adult attachment styles, climate and comfort in training, and social empathy.”

In short, he is a relational expert.

But it does not take an expert to know that relationships can be tough. Friendships, romances, and family ties, all can be sources of both exceptional joy and great discomfort.

Many times, outside factors can cause waves in relationships. Other times, it’s our internal responses that cause the turmoil. We cannot control the external factors, but we can choose how we respond. “Volatility is common in relationships, and often it’s because we don’t know how to accurately and honestly express ourselves,” Dr. Rogers said.

Dr. Rogers has three, “very simple, yet very difficult to execute” tips for navigating and fostering emotionally healthy relationships.

Define

Feelings are universal. Regardless of religion, race, and culture, every person on earth has felt happy, sad, shame, anger, joy, fear, and confusion. “The universal language of feelings allows people to connect and empathize with each other,” Dr. Rogers said.

To connect well with others, you first have to know how you feel. We often give an array of reasons why we’re angry without just stating that we are angry. This is more accusatory than honest. Conversations are volatile from the get-go.

The first step to resolving conflict is to dig into the core of the issue. This process begins with self-examination. One cannot explain how the something or someone made them feel until they take time to explore their feelings and then define them.

“For healthy relationships, you first need to learn your feelings,” Dr. Rogers said. “Define how you are feeling in a given moment. Be aware of what you are feeling first before you explain the inducing factors to someone else.”

It sounds easy, but this takes practice. Our feelings can become lost over the static of our busy lives. It’s not until we sit, dig through and examine how we feel are we able to accurately communicate. “Otherwise, it’s like shooting from the hip,” Dr. Rogers said.

Communicate

“Be able and willing to tell the truth,” Dr. Rogers said. “It’s OK to say, ‘I’m not going to sugar coat this: I am really angry.’ Expressing how you feel is the second way to own it. By doing so, you take responsibility for your feelings.”

People might tell you to “not sweat the small stuff.” So we often try to hide what we feel. God is an emotional being, we are made in his image. We neglect our humanity when we brush our pain under the rug.

“Feelings are not a choice,” Dr. Rogers said. “They are more visceral. What you do with content and knowledge are choices. Who you vote for and how you arrange your Fantasy Football lineup are choices. Feelings are the basic things that happen in all of us. You respect your value when you take ownership of the way you feel. This allows you to be seen by others as who you are without hiding behind morals, religion or extraneous circumstances.”

Have the courage to tell others how you are feeling. Be honest. Be truthful. Don’t minimize your feelings.

Communicating exactly what you feel allows you to connect with one another. It becomes a shared experience. Transparency cultivates intimacy and empathy. Even if someone does not agree, the door is opened for them to know you better. Respect is the desired outcome.

Listen

“Do to others, as you would have them do to you,” is called the Golden Rule. We desire to be heard when we share our inner thoughts. This sentiment goes both ways. Others, too, want to feel heard.

“Be available and listen,” Dr. Rogers said. “It takes practice to learn how to listen while not being defensive or minimizing. Someone might be angry at you, but you can still listen while knowing that it is not because you necessarily did anything wrong. Expectations might have been miscommunicated. By listening without becoming defensive or minimizing, you open the door to connect better and find a solution.”

Listening gives you the opportunity to win the heart of people, not necessarily the argument. Which is more important to you?

Feelings are complex. Understanding what we feel can be murky. We create bridges for authentic conversations and emotionally healthy relationships when we define how we feel and communicate honestly.

Dr. Rogers teaches The Personal Spiritual Life of the Counselor and Healthy Family Functioning. Sit in on one of Dr. Rogers’ classes. Contact us or RSVP for Preview Day.

Attachment and the Trauma Spectrum

Attachment and the Trauma Spectrum

Presents

Attachment and the Trauma Spectrum

Richmont is opening a portion of this course to Richmont alumni and the surrounding community for Continuing Education Credit. Please note that this is only a portion of an entire course offered for a reduced fee. If you are interested in auditing or taking the entire course for course credit, please contact our registrar. This event is not sponsored by the alumni association and does not fall under the benefits of founding membership status.

February 2, 2018

Richmont Graduate University

1900 The Exchange SE, Bldg. 100, Atlanta, GA 30339

Register HERE!

Presented by:

Dan Sartor, PhD, LCPC, NCC

Dan Sartor is the Vice President of Integration and Associate Professor of Counseling at Richmont Graduate University in Atlanta, GA. He is a licensed Clinical Psychologist (IL & GA), Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (IL), and Nationally Board Certified Counselor. Dr. Sartor specializes in integrating issues of faith and spirituality with psychology and counseling practice.  Other clinical specialties include complex trauma recovery, sexuality issues, addiction recovery, marital therapy, and crises of faith. Dr. Sartor regularly speaks on complex trauma recovery and is the co-author of  i:CARE: A Health Care Provider’s Guide to Recognizing and Caring for Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking Victims (2016).

Dr. Sartor is the husband of Robin, with whom he gladly shares the joys and challenges of life. Together, they are raising four children who span the ages—and many activities—of middle school and high school. He enjoys camping with his family, reading, music, and home improvement projects. Dr. Sartor received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Biola University (Rosemead School of Psychology), and he holds an M.A. in Counseling from Reformed Theological Seminary. Dr. Sartor’s undergraduate degree is in music. In past vocational seasons, he has had the privilege of serving as the Director of Counseling Services and Associate Professor of Psychology at Trinity Christian College, maintaining a full-time private practice, and serving vocationally in pastoral ministry as a Presbyterian minister. He remains passionate about the work of soul care and the practice of psychology.  His personal mission is to facilitate spiritual vitality and relational restoration through teaching, counseling, writing, and personal encounters in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. More information about Dr. Sartor’s clinical work and experiences are available at www.dansartorphd.com.

Course Description

Trauma produces variable impact upon individuals based upon it type, timing, severity, duration, and numerous individual protective factors across survivors.  This workshop will provide a framework for understanding post-trauma phenomena across the life span by, first, highlighting the biopsychosocial and spiritual dimensions of health according to Interpersonal Neurobiology and Attachment Theory, identifying five characteristics of adaptive resilience in secure attachment.  Next, the disruption of secure attachment through neglect, extreme stress, complex loss, trauma, and interpersonal trauma will be described, including resilience, post-traumatic growth, and the possible resulting impact on an individual’s attachment dynamics.  Classifications of post trauma disorders from the Diagnostic Statistical Manual—5 (DSM-5), International Classification of Disease-10 (ICD10), and the literature on Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified (i.e., Complex Trauma) will be applied for understanding the unique impact of interpersonal trauma on the individual.  The workshop will conclude with an overview of trauma resilience, post-traumatic growth, and vicarious trauma.

Target Audience: Marriage and Family Therapists, Clinical Mental Health Counselors, Psychologists, and Graduate Students.

Course Objectives

Within the context of this 6-hour workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe biopsychosocial dimensions of health according to Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB) and Attachment Theory
  • Identify five characteristics of health and adaptive resilience according to IPNB
  • Define the four styles of attachment according to Attachment Theory: Secure, Preoccupied, Dismissive, and Disorganized
  • Recognize the disruption to health often caused by neglect, extreme stress, complex loss/grief, and interpersonal trauma
  • Apply Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – 5 (DSM-5) International Classification of Disease-10 (ICD-10) framework for Posttraumatic Disorders
  • Describe the impact of trauma on an individual’s spirituality and world-view
  • Recognize the signs of Dissociative Identity Disorder
  • Identify six areas of disturbance caused by interpersonal trauma according to the literature on complex trauma (Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified; DESNOS)
  • Describe the difference between resilience, post-traumatic growth, and vicarious trauma

Basic Topic Schedule

Date Lecture
February 2 Session 1: A Standard of Health: Attachment Theory and Interpersonal Neurobiology (Objectives 1 & 2)

Session 2: Disrupting the Trajectory of Health: The Impact of Trauma and Insecure Attachment (Objectives 3 & 4)

Lunch Break (12-1PM)

Session 3: Post-Traumatic Stress: The DSM-5 and ICD-10 (Objectives 5 & 6)

Session 4: Dissociation and Dissociative Diagnoses in the DSM-5 (Objective 7)

Session 5: Complex Trauma: Signs and Symptoms (Objective 8)

Session 6: Resilience, Treatment for Trauma, Post-traumatic Growth, and Vicarious Trauma (Objective 9)

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Continuing Education:

6 CE clock hours available

Workshop Level:

Beginner to Intermediate

Course Schedule:

February 2, 2018: 9am – 5pm

Fees: $125

Registration: Click HERE

For CE and registration question, please contact Martha Busby.

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified.

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychologist Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

 

Campus Visit Schedule

We’re headed to your campus! Meet our admissions counselors and discover how you can make a positive impact on people through our Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling or Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy degrees. Richmont students begin practicing immediately upon graduation.

Begin your graduate school journey. Find your college and schedule a 15-minute one-on-one with one of our admission counselors. We look forward to meeting you!

FIND YOUR SCHOOL and MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT

Calvin College on 10/18/17. Meet Elizabeth

University of Georgia on 10/18/17. Meet Claire

Berry College on 10/24/17. Meet Claire

Kennesaw State University on 10/24/17. Meet Claire

 

 

 

The Person of the Therapist Model of Clinical Supervision

The Person of the Therapist Model of Clinical Supervision

The Person of the Therapist Model of Clinical Supervision

Friday, October 13, 2017

Richmont Graduate University

1900 The Exchange SE, Bldg. 100, Atlanta, GA 30339

9:00am – 12:00pm

 Registration: Click HERE

Presenter

Patricia R. Harwell, MN, LMFT has taught and practiced in the Atlanta area for over 35 years.  Pat earned a Master’s degree in Psychiatric Nursing at Emory University where she subsequently served on the faculty for 6 years.  While teaching graduate students in Psychiatric Nursing, Pat began course work and supervision to become a Marriage and Family Therapist, earning both Clinical Membership and the Approved Supervisor designation with AAMFT.  The art and skill of supervision have been of particular interest to Pat since the early days of supervising Master’s level psychiatric nursing students.  In the late 1990’s, Pat and an MFT colleague developed and taught a 30 hour didactic and interactive course on supervision which was certified by AAMFT for training Approved Supervisors.  During that time, Pat also taught post-graduate MFT courses and provided workshops in supervision for both AAMFT and GAMFT. In addition to teaching and providing supervision, she has maintained a private practice in MFT for the past 30 years.   Pat was appointed to the GA Composite Board of PC, CSW and MFT in 2001 and served continuously until August 2011.  Currently Pat is the Chair of GAMFT’s Approved Supervision Committee.

Course Description

A review of supervision literature supports the generally held belief that therapists who are self-aware and possess insight into their impact on clients achieve better outcomes than therapists who exhibit little insight into themselves and their motivations.  This three hour workshop presents an overview of the Person of the Therapist model of supervision as a way of developing therapists who are both clinically competent and self-aware in their work with clients.

Course Objectives:  Within the context of this 3 hour workshop, participants will:

  • Identify and articulate the essential elements of the Person of the Therapist model of supervision and therapy.
  • Acquire tools designed to assist supervisees in identifying their “signature themes” and the potential impact of these themes on the therapeutic process.
  • Compare and contrast the concepts of Isomorphism, Countertransference and Self of the Therapist Training.

Registration Information

Continuing Education: Three CE clock hours awarded.

Fees:

  • Richmont Graduate University Legacy and Founding Alumni Association Members, Hope Center Supervisors, Faculty, Staff, and Students (We regret that Site Supervisors do not qualify for free entry to this particular training event):FREE
  • Basic Alumni Association Members: $30.00
  • Site Supervisors, Nonmembers, Friends of Alumni: $65.00

Registration: Click HERE

For questions, please contact Martha Busby at mbusby@richmont.edu

Refunds will only be issued if requested prior to October 13.

 

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identifited. RGU is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

This workshop has been approved as Core hours by the Georgia Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

Development and Evaluation of Mental Health Clinicians: Application of a Conceptual Model for Supervision

Development and Evaluation of Mental Health Clinicians: Application of a Conceptual Model for Supervision

Development and Evaluation of Mental Health Clinicians: Application of a Conceptual Model for Supervision

Friday, September 29, 2017

Richmont Graduate University

1815 McCallie Avenue, Chattanooga, TN 37404

9:00am – 4:30pm

*lunch on your own*

 Registration: Click HERE

Presented by

Sonja A. Sutherland, Ph.D. LPC, NCC, CPCS

Sonja Sutherland is an Assistant Professor of Counseling at Richmont Graduate University, a Visiting Professor for Uganda Christian University, and the founder and Executive Director of Legacy Changers, LLC.   She is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the state of Georgia, a Certified Professional Counselor Supervisor (CPCS), and a Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC) through the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC).  She is also a member of the American Counseling Association (ACA), the Southern Association of Counselor Educators and Supervisors (SACES), the Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling (ASERVIC), and the Licensed Professional Counselor Association of Georgia (LPCAGA).

Course Description:  Using an interactive group format, this workshop provides practical information on how supervisors can help supervisees to improve the effectiveness and outcomes of their clinical service provision. Topics include considerations for developing and evaluating supervisees of differing skills levels through the application of an evidence-based model of supervision. Utilizing thought-provoking case vignettes addressing issues such as race, sexual orientation and religious values, ethical decision-making in supervision will also be touched on.

Course Objectives:  Within the context of this 6 hour workshop, participants will:

  • Develop proficiency in supervision implementation through role-play
  • Apply supervision model to case vignettes
  • Develop increased understanding of stages and process of supervisee development
  • Gain greater understanding of ethical considerations relevant to clinical supervision through vignette discussion & role plays
  • Apply supervision model to cases involving race, sexual orientation and religious values for greater
  • Develop increased understanding of cultural considerations in supervision

Registration Information

Continuing Education: Six CE clock hours awarded. 3 Ethics hours and 3 Supervision hours awarded.

Fees:

  • Richmont Graduate University Legacy and Founding Alumni Association Members, Current Clinical Supervisors, Faculty, Staff, and Students: FREE
  • Basic Alumni Association Members: $30.00
  • Nonmembers/Friends of Alumni: $75.00

Registration: Click HERE

For questions, please contact Martha Busby at mbusby@richmont.edu

Refunds will only be issued if requested prior to September 29.

 

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identifited. RGU is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.