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Three Emotionally Healthy Ways to Navigate Relationships

Relationships are tricky. Feelings can be complicated.

Arguments and emotional turmoil can be the result of miscommunication and a lack of self-awareness. A lack of connectedness with oneself and others is often to blame.

Dr. Tyler Rogers is an assistant professor of counseling at Richmont Graduate University. He has a Ph.D. in Counselor Education from the University of Mississippi where he explored, “The relationships between advocacy competency, adult attachment styles, climate and comfort in training, and social empathy.”

In short, he is a relational expert.

But it does not take an expert to know that relationships can be tough. Friendships, romances, and family ties, all can be sources of both exceptional joy and great discomfort.

Many times, outside factors can cause waves in relationships. Other times, it’s our internal responses that cause the turmoil. We cannot control the external factors, but we can choose how we respond. “Volatility is common in relationships, and often it’s because we don’t know how to accurately and honestly express ourselves,” Dr. Rogers said.

Dr. Rogers has three, “very simple, yet very difficult to execute” tips for navigating and fostering emotionally healthy relationships.

Define

Feelings are universal. Regardless of religion, race, and culture, every person on earth has felt happy, sad, shame, anger, joy, fear, and confusion. “The universal language of feelings allows people to connect and empathize with each other,” Dr. Rogers said.

To connect well with others, you first have to know how you feel. We often give an array of reasons why we’re angry without just stating that we are angry. This is more accusatory than honest. Conversations are volatile from the get-go.

The first step to resolving conflict is to dig into the core of the issue. This process begins with self-examination. One cannot explain how the something or someone made them feel until they take time to explore their feelings and then define them.

“For healthy relationships, you first need to learn your feelings,” Dr. Rogers said. “Define how you are feeling in a given moment. Be aware of what you are feeling first before you explain the inducing factors to someone else.”

It sounds easy, but this takes practice. Our feelings can become lost over the static of our busy lives. It’s not until we sit, dig through and examine how we feel are we able to accurately communicate. “Otherwise, it’s like shooting from the hip,” Dr. Rogers said.

Communicate

“Be able and willing to tell the truth,” Dr. Rogers said. “It’s OK to say, ‘I’m not going to sugar coat this: I am really angry.’ Expressing how you feel is the second way to own it. By doing so, you take responsibility for your feelings.”

People might tell you to “not sweat the small stuff.” So we often try to hide what we feel. God is an emotional being, we are made in his image. We neglect our humanity when we brush our pain under the rug.

“Feelings are not a choice,” Dr. Rogers said. “They are more visceral. What you do with content and knowledge are choices. Who you vote for and how you arrange your Fantasy Football lineup are choices. Feelings are the basic things that happen in all of us. You respect your value when you take ownership of the way you feel. This allows you to be seen by others as who you are without hiding behind morals, religion or extraneous circumstances.”

Have the courage to tell others how you are feeling. Be honest. Be truthful. Don’t minimize your feelings.

Communicating exactly what you feel allows you to connect with one another. It becomes a shared experience. Transparency cultivates intimacy and empathy. Even if someone does not agree, the door is opened for them to know you better. Respect is the desired outcome.

Listen

“Do to others, as you would have them do to you,” is called the Golden Rule. We desire to be heard when we share our inner thoughts. This sentiment goes both ways. Others, too, want to feel heard.

“Be available and listen,” Dr. Rogers said. “It takes practice to learn how to listen while not being defensive or minimizing. Someone might be angry at you, but you can still listen while knowing that it is not because you necessarily did anything wrong. Expectations might have been miscommunicated. By listening without becoming defensive or minimizing, you open the door to connect better and find a solution.”

Listening gives you the opportunity to win the heart of people, not necessarily the argument. Which is more important to you?

Feelings are complex. Understanding what we feel can be murky. We create bridges for authentic conversations and emotionally healthy relationships when we define how we feel and communicate honestly.

Dr. Rogers teaches The Personal Spiritual Life of the Counselor and Healthy Family Functioning. Sit in on one of Dr. Rogers’ classes. Contact us or RSVP for Preview Day.

Attachment and the Trauma Spectrum

Attachment and the Trauma Spectrum

Presents

Attachment and the Trauma Spectrum

Richmont is opening a portion of this course to Richmont alumni and the surrounding community for Continuing Education Credit. Please note that this is only a portion of an entire course offered for a reduced fee. If you are interested in auditing or taking the entire course for course credit, please contact our registrar. This event is not sponsored by the alumni association and does not fall under the benefits of founding membership status.

February 2, 2018

Richmont Graduate University

1900 The Exchange SE, Bldg. 100, Atlanta, GA 30339

Register HERE!

Presented by:

Dan Sartor, PhD, LCPC, NCC

Dan Sartor is the Vice President of Integration and Associate Professor of Counseling at Richmont Graduate University in Atlanta, GA. He is a licensed Clinical Psychologist (IL & GA), Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (IL), and Nationally Board Certified Counselor. Dr. Sartor specializes in integrating issues of faith and spirituality with psychology and counseling practice.  Other clinical specialties include complex trauma recovery, sexuality issues, addiction recovery, marital therapy, and crises of faith. Dr. Sartor regularly speaks on complex trauma recovery and is the co-author of  i:CARE: A Health Care Provider’s Guide to Recognizing and Caring for Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking Victims (2016).

Dr. Sartor is the husband of Robin, with whom he gladly shares the joys and challenges of life. Together, they are raising four children who span the ages—and many activities—of middle school and high school. He enjoys camping with his family, reading, music, and home improvement projects. Dr. Sartor received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Biola University (Rosemead School of Psychology), and he holds an M.A. in Counseling from Reformed Theological Seminary. Dr. Sartor’s undergraduate degree is in music. In past vocational seasons, he has had the privilege of serving as the Director of Counseling Services and Associate Professor of Psychology at Trinity Christian College, maintaining a full-time private practice, and serving vocationally in pastoral ministry as a Presbyterian minister. He remains passionate about the work of soul care and the practice of psychology.  His personal mission is to facilitate spiritual vitality and relational restoration through teaching, counseling, writing, and personal encounters in the lives of individuals, families, and communities. More information about Dr. Sartor’s clinical work and experiences are available at www.dansartorphd.com.

Course Description

Trauma produces variable impact upon individuals based upon it type, timing, severity, duration, and numerous individual protective factors across survivors.  This workshop will provide a framework for understanding post-trauma phenomena across the life span by, first, highlighting the biopsychosocial and spiritual dimensions of health according to Interpersonal Neurobiology and Attachment Theory, identifying five characteristics of adaptive resilience in secure attachment.  Next, the disruption of secure attachment through neglect, extreme stress, complex loss, trauma, and interpersonal trauma will be described, including resilience, post-traumatic growth, and the possible resulting impact on an individual’s attachment dynamics.  Classifications of post trauma disorders from the Diagnostic Statistical Manual—5 (DSM-5), International Classification of Disease-10 (ICD10), and the literature on Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified (i.e., Complex Trauma) will be applied for understanding the unique impact of interpersonal trauma on the individual.  The workshop will conclude with an overview of trauma resilience, post-traumatic growth, and vicarious trauma.

Target Audience: Marriage and Family Therapists, Clinical Mental Health Counselors, Psychologists, and Graduate Students.

Course Objectives

Within the context of this 6-hour workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe biopsychosocial dimensions of health according to Interpersonal Neurobiology (IPNB) and Attachment Theory
  • Identify five characteristics of health and adaptive resilience according to IPNB
  • Define the four styles of attachment according to Attachment Theory: Secure, Preoccupied, Dismissive, and Disorganized
  • Recognize the disruption to health often caused by neglect, extreme stress, complex loss/grief, and interpersonal trauma
  • Apply Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – 5 (DSM-5) International Classification of Disease-10 (ICD-10) framework for Posttraumatic Disorders
  • Describe the impact of trauma on an individual’s spirituality and world-view
  • Recognize the signs of Dissociative Identity Disorder
  • Identify six areas of disturbance caused by interpersonal trauma according to the literature on complex trauma (Disorders of Extreme Stress Not Otherwise Specified; DESNOS)
  • Describe the difference between resilience, post-traumatic growth, and vicarious trauma

Basic Topic Schedule

Date Lecture
February 2 Session 1: A Standard of Health: Attachment Theory and Interpersonal Neurobiology (Objectives 1 & 2)

Session 2: Disrupting the Trajectory of Health: The Impact of Trauma and Insecure Attachment (Objectives 3 & 4)

Lunch Break (12-1PM)

Session 3: Post-Traumatic Stress: The DSM-5 and ICD-10 (Objectives 5 & 6)

Session 4: Dissociation and Dissociative Diagnoses in the DSM-5 (Objective 7)

Session 5: Complex Trauma: Signs and Symptoms (Objective 8)

Session 6: Resilience, Treatment for Trauma, Post-traumatic Growth, and Vicarious Trauma (Objective 9)

REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Continuing Education:

6 CE clock hours available

Workshop Level:

Beginner to Intermediate

Course Schedule:

February 2, 2018: 9am – 5pm

Fees: $125

Registration: Click HERE

For CE and registration question, please contact Martha Busby.

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified.

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychologist Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

 

Campus Visit Schedule

We’re headed to your campus! Meet our admissions counselors and discover how you can make a positive impact on people through our Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling or Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy degrees. Richmont students begin practicing immediately upon graduation.

Begin your graduate school journey. Find your college and schedule a 15-minute one-on-one with one of our admission counselors. We look forward to meeting you!

FIND YOUR SCHOOL and MAKE YOUR APPOINTMENT

Calvin College on 10/18/17. Meet Elizabeth

University of Georgia on 10/18/17. Meet Claire

Berry College on 10/24/17. Meet Claire

Kennesaw State University on 10/24/17. Meet Claire

 

 

 

The Person of the Therapist Model of Clinical Supervision

The Person of the Therapist Model of Clinical Supervision

The Person of the Therapist Model of Clinical Supervision

Friday, October 13, 2017

Richmont Graduate University

1900 The Exchange SE, Bldg. 100, Atlanta, GA 30339

9:00am – 12:00pm

 Registration: Click HERE

Presenter

Patricia R. Harwell, MN, LMFT has taught and practiced in the Atlanta area for over 35 years.  Pat earned a Master’s degree in Psychiatric Nursing at Emory University where she subsequently served on the faculty for 6 years.  While teaching graduate students in Psychiatric Nursing, Pat began course work and supervision to become a Marriage and Family Therapist, earning both Clinical Membership and the Approved Supervisor designation with AAMFT.  The art and skill of supervision have been of particular interest to Pat since the early days of supervising Master’s level psychiatric nursing students.  In the late 1990’s, Pat and an MFT colleague developed and taught a 30 hour didactic and interactive course on supervision which was certified by AAMFT for training Approved Supervisors.  During that time, Pat also taught post-graduate MFT courses and provided workshops in supervision for both AAMFT and GAMFT. In addition to teaching and providing supervision, she has maintained a private practice in MFT for the past 30 years.   Pat was appointed to the GA Composite Board of PC, CSW and MFT in 2001 and served continuously until August 2011.  Currently Pat is the Chair of GAMFT’s Approved Supervision Committee.

Course Description

A review of supervision literature supports the generally held belief that therapists who are self-aware and possess insight into their impact on clients achieve better outcomes than therapists who exhibit little insight into themselves and their motivations.  This three hour workshop presents an overview of the Person of the Therapist model of supervision as a way of developing therapists who are both clinically competent and self-aware in their work with clients.

Course Objectives:  Within the context of this 3 hour workshop, participants will:

  • Identify and articulate the essential elements of the Person of the Therapist model of supervision and therapy.
  • Acquire tools designed to assist supervisees in identifying their “signature themes” and the potential impact of these themes on the therapeutic process.
  • Compare and contrast the concepts of Isomorphism, Countertransference and Self of the Therapist Training.

Registration Information

Continuing Education: Three CE clock hours awarded.

Fees:

  • Richmont Graduate University Legacy and Founding Alumni Association Members, Hope Center Supervisors, Faculty, Staff, and Students (We regret that Site Supervisors do not qualify for free entry to this particular training event):FREE
  • Basic Alumni Association Members: $30.00
  • Site Supervisors, Nonmembers, Friends of Alumni: $65.00

Registration: Click HERE

For questions, please contact Martha Busby at mbusby@richmont.edu

Refunds will only be issued if requested prior to October 13.

 

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identifited. RGU is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

This workshop has been approved as Core hours by the Georgia Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

Development and Evaluation of Mental Health Clinicians: Application of a Conceptual Model for Supervision

Development and Evaluation of Mental Health Clinicians: Application of a Conceptual Model for Supervision

Development and Evaluation of Mental Health Clinicians: Application of a Conceptual Model for Supervision

Friday, September 29, 2017

Richmont Graduate University

1815 McCallie Avenue, Chattanooga, TN 37404

9:00am – 4:30pm

*lunch on your own*

 Registration: Click HERE

Presented by

Sonja A. Sutherland, Ph.D. LPC, NCC, CPCS

Sonja Sutherland is an Assistant Professor of Counseling at Richmont Graduate University, a Visiting Professor for Uganda Christian University, and the founder and Executive Director of Legacy Changers, LLC.   She is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the state of Georgia, a Certified Professional Counselor Supervisor (CPCS), and a Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC) through the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC).  She is also a member of the American Counseling Association (ACA), the Southern Association of Counselor Educators and Supervisors (SACES), the Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling (ASERVIC), and the Licensed Professional Counselor Association of Georgia (LPCAGA).

Course Description:  Using an interactive group format, this workshop provides practical information on how supervisors can help supervisees to improve the effectiveness and outcomes of their clinical service provision. Topics include considerations for developing and evaluating supervisees of differing skills levels through the application of an evidence-based model of supervision. Utilizing thought-provoking case vignettes addressing issues such as race, sexual orientation and religious values, ethical decision-making in supervision will also be touched on.

Course Objectives:  Within the context of this 6 hour workshop, participants will:

  • Develop proficiency in supervision implementation through role-play
  • Apply supervision model to case vignettes
  • Develop increased understanding of stages and process of supervisee development
  • Gain greater understanding of ethical considerations relevant to clinical supervision through vignette discussion & role plays
  • Apply supervision model to cases involving race, sexual orientation and religious values for greater
  • Develop increased understanding of cultural considerations in supervision

Registration Information

Continuing Education: Six CE clock hours awarded. 3 Ethics hours and 3 Supervision hours awarded.

Fees:

  • Richmont Graduate University Legacy and Founding Alumni Association Members, Current Clinical Supervisors, Faculty, Staff, and Students: FREE
  • Basic Alumni Association Members: $30.00
  • Nonmembers/Friends of Alumni: $75.00

Registration: Click HERE

For questions, please contact Martha Busby at mbusby@richmont.edu

Refunds will only be issued if requested prior to September 29.

 

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identifited. RGU is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

 

 

Restoring the Pleasure

Restoring the Pleasure

ISW

Along with

Richmont_Chalice Top_Med Blue

Restoring the Pleasure

Saturday, June 24, 2017

9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

Richmont Graduate University

1900 The Exchange, Building 100, Atlanta, GA 30339

This event is not sponsored by the Alumni Association and does not fall under the benefits of Founding Membership status.

Registration: click here

PRESENTERS

Dr. Clifford and Joyce Penner are sexual therapists, educators and the authors of ten books. They work together as a team:

  • Counseling individuals and couples,
  • Leading sexual enhancement seminars for couples,
  • Teaching sex-education for pre-teens and their parents,
  • Speaking with men’s and women’s groups,
  • Lecturing at universities, and
  • Training fellow professionals throughout the world.  In addition to Canada, Mexico and the U.S., they have taught in Jamaica, Kenya, the Philippines, Singapore, Bali, Jakarta, Australia, Germany, Austria, Switzerland and France.

Cliff Penner, PhD

Cliff Penner, PhD is a clinical psychologist, received a B.A. from Bethel College, St. Paul, MN; earned a M.A. in theology at Fuller Theological Seminary, and has his Ph.D. from Fuller’s Graduate School of Psychology, Pasadena, CA.

Joyce Penner, MN

Joyce Penner, MN is a clinical nurse specialist has a B.S. in nursing from the University of Washington and a master’s degree in psychosomatic nursing and nursing education from U.C.L.A.

The Penners are best known for their pioneer work in encouraging people of all faiths to connect their sexuality with their belief system ─ helping them embrace sex as good and of God, opening the topic of sexuality within churches of many denominations.You may reach them at 626.449.2525 or penners@attglobal.net and learn more about them and their associates.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Sexual problems do not heal themselves; in fact they perpetuate themselves & fuel tension in marriage. Talk therapy alone rarely reverses these negative sexual patterns. Family of origin factors, which frequently contribute to sexual issues, need to be understood, but understanding does not change negative sexual interactions. Likewise, the person with past trauma or habituated responses must process the impact these have on sexual intimacy and be empowered to overcome those consequences. However, their sexual patterns often do not change as the result of that therapy. Restoring the Pleasure presents a comprehensive, systematic approach in which the couple is retrained to behave and communicate with each other in ways that reduce demand, enhance mutual pleasure and, facilitate the natural physiological sexual responses.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Within the context of this 6-hour workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Assess updated knowledge, principles, information, and tools to be utilized in treating couples presenting with distressing sexual issues.
  • Explain the multiple domains of negative sexual issues.
  • Observe course presenters demonstrate how to apply this knowledge, information, and interventions into clinical practice.
  • Practice applying this knowledge, information, and interventions in dyads.
  • Recognize and practice safe therapeutic boundaries when dealing with sexual issues in the clinical setting.
  • Explain the accuracy and utility of materials presented, limitations of content, and most common risks when practicing sex therapy.

BASIC TOPIC SCHEDULE

Time Lecture Topic
9:00 AM – 10:30 AM Restoring the Pleasure Part I
10:45 AM – 12:15 PM Round Table Discussion with Cliff and Joyce Penner
1:15 PM – 2:45 PM Restoring the Pleasure Part II
3:00 – 4:30 PM Guided Peer Consultation Groups with Cliff and Joyce Penner


REGISTRATION INFORMATION

Continuing Education: 6 CE clock hours available

Workshop Level: Beginner

Course Schedule: 9:00 AM – 4:30 PM

One 15 minute morning break | One hour lunch break | One 15 minute afternoon break

Fees

$150.00 per registrant.

Or

Register for Restoring the Pleasure and the Sexual Ethics CE (Friday, June 23rd) and receive a $50.00 discount. Attend both CE events and receive 12 CE clock hours for only $250.00 per registrant.

Registration

For registration click here

For CE or registration questions, please contact Martha Busby at

mbusby@richmont.edu

For other questions, please contact Mallory Reynolds or Cory Taylor at

m.reynolds@sexualwholeness.com

c.rodgers@sexualwholeness.com

Also

The Penners are inviting you to email them at penners@attglobal.net with any topics, questions, and client situations related to Sexual Retraining that you would like them to address during this 6 hour work-shop. Please email before the week of June 24th, 2017

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychologist Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

APA Sponsor Low Res

Green Cross: Compassion Stress Management

Green Cross: Compassion Stress Management

Registration: Click HERE

*Please contact Martha Busby (mbusby@richmont.edu or 404.835.6121) if you have problems registering.

This event is not sponsored by the Alumni Association and does not fall under the benefits of a Founding Membership.

When: November 17, 2017

8:30am -5:00pm (lunch on your own)

Where: Richmont Graduate University- Chattanooga Campus, 1815 McCallie Avenue, Chattanooga, TN 37404

Continuing Education: 6 NBCC CE Clock Hours Awarded. 6 approved CE Clock Hours Awarded to Psychologists. Partial attendance is not awarded.

Certification Criteria:  This course satisfies the criteria for Certified Compassion Fatigue Therapist.

Target Audience:  This is an intermediate level training for professionals, students, and laypersons working with traumatized populations, including disaster survivors.

Fees:

  • Richmont Students= $80.00
  • Professionals= $120.00

Presenter: Vanessa Snyder, PhD

Dr.Vanessa Snyder is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Certified Sex Therapist, Certified Traumatologist and AAMFT Approved Supervisor in Training.. She received her PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision from Regent University in VA. Her areas of research interests include: sexual abuse and trauma; trauma effects on the God perception; trauma treatment with play/art therapy, assessment in treatment of adults who experience trauma/complex trauma; secondary traumatic stress, complex trauma model protocol used for human trafficking and dissociative disorders. She is currently working with on research and program evaluations of trauma treatment models in sex trafficking shelters.

Topic: This workshop will enable each course participant to effectively build a therapeutic alliance and focus on the professional’s current self-care status, building a commitment to wellness and the motivation to fundamentally transform his or her work life style. This transformation to wellness includes but is not limited to teaching effective compassion stress management methods for both containment/control of unwanted distress and finding and applying effective desensitization methods in therapy.

Learning Objectives: As a result of attending this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Articulate the developmental history of compassion fatigue including countertransference, caregiver stress, burnout, vicarious traumatization, and secondary traumatic stress
  • Differentiate between compassion fatigue, secondary traumatic stress, and vicarious traumatization
  • Articulate the unique array of symptoms indigenous to compassion fatigue
  • Assess and identify symptoms of compassion fatigue in self and others
  • Recognize compassion fatigue triggers and early warning signs
  • Articulate current theoretical models for the etiology and transmission of compassion fatigue
  • Articulate and teach others the potential effects of traumatic stress upon systems (marriage, family, workplace, etc)
  • Identify and utilize resources and plans for resiliency and prevention for self and ability to facilitate this plan with others
  • Describe what is required to create and maintain a self-care plan for self and others as well as be familiar with the Academy of Traumatology’s Standards of Self Care for Traumatologists
  • Discuss what is required to facilitate a self-care plan for self and others
  • Provide psycho-education on the causes, symptoms, prevention, and treatment of compassion fatigue
  • Abide by the Academy of Traumatology Standards of Practice and Ethics

Agenda:

Part I – Introduction and Overview
Part II – Definitions
Part III – Theory of Compassion Fatigue
Part IV Standards of Care
Part V – Inventories of Self Care
Part VI – Creating a Self-Care Plan
Part VII – Creating a Self-Care Plan

Registration: Click HERE

For questions regarding this course, please contact Dr. Vanessa Snyder at vsndyer@richmont.edu.

For questions about registration or Continuing Education, please contact Martha Busby at mbusby@richmont.edu.

Refunds must be requested prior to the start of the course.

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Richmont Graduate University is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. 

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychologist Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.


   NBCC Logo2 2011APA Sponsor Low ResGreen Cross

Psychology of Aging

Psychology of Aging

Registration: click HERE

 This event is not sponsored by the alumni association and does not fall under the benefits of founding membership status.

When: January 4, 2016, 9:00am- 5:30pm (lunch on your own)

Where: Richmont Graduate University

                 1900 The Exchange SE, Building 100

                 Atlanta, GA 30339

Continuing Education: 6.5 NBCC-approved CE Clock hours Awarded. 6.5 approved CE Clock Hours Awarded to Psychologists.

Fee: $100.00

Presenter: DeAnne Terrell, Ph.D.

 Registration: Click HERE

Please direct your questions regarding registration to Autumn Stephenson at astephenson@richmont.edu.

Refunds must be requested prior to January 3, 2016.

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Richmont Graduate University is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. 

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychologist Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

NBCC Logo 2011                                                                          APA Sponsor Low Res

Grief and Bereavement

Grief and Bereavement

Registration: click HERE

 This event is not sponsored by the alumni association and does not fall under the benefits of founding membership status.

When: January 6, 2016, 9:00am- 5:30pm (lunch on your own)

Where: Richmont Graduate University

                 1900 The Exchange SE, Building 100

                 Atlanta, GA 30339

Continuing Education: 6.5 NBCC-approved CE Clock hours Awarded. 6.5 approved CE Clock Hours Awarded to Psychologists. No Partial Credit will be awarded.

Fee: $100.00

Presenters: Amanda Blackburn, Psy.D. and Vanessa Snyder, Ph.D.

Dr. Amanda Blackburn is Dean of Students and Assistant Professor of Counseling at Richmont Graduate University. Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor. Licensed Psychologist. Psy.D., M.A.  Wheaton College; B.A., Asbury College. Specializations: Adolescent and Adult Women’s Development, Interpersonal Relationships, Grief, Spiritual Issues, Depression and Anxiety. Member: APA, CAPS.

Dr.Vanessa Snyder is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, Certified Sex Therapist and AAMFT Approved Supervisor in Training. She is a 2008 graduate as well as the Dean of Clinical Affairs at Richmont Graduate University. She received her PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision from Regent University in VA. Her areas of research interests include: sexual abuse and trauma; trauma effects on the God perception; trauma treatment with play/art therapy, assessment in treatment of adults who experience trauma/complex trauma; secondary traumatic stress, complex trauma model protocol used for human trafficking and dissociative disorders. She is currently working with Hope for Justice (Nashville, TN) on research and program evaluations of trauma treatment models in sex trafficking shelters. Vanessa is also the Academic Dean for the Institute of Sexual Wholeness

 

Topic: 

This introductory course explores the grief and bereavement process from psychological, interpersonal, cultural, historical, developmental, systemic, and integrative perspectives. Those in the course will learn introductory level assessment and treatment of normal, pathological, and traumatic grief by health care professionals. Participants will explore components of a theology of suffering. The signifcance of therapist self-awareness, discernment, and self-care will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives: As a result of attending this seminar, participants will be able to:

  • Identify and understand the changes, losses and transitions of bereavement.
  • Describe the biopsychosocial and spiritual components to grief.
  • Assess the effects of grief on the family system.
  • Demonstrate understanding of developmental and cultural differences that shape the bereavement process.
  • Explain the effects of the grief process on the physical and psychological system.
  • Apply strategies for competent grief work.

Registration: Click HERE

Please direct your questions regarding registration to Autumn Stephenson at astephenson@richmont.edu.

Refunds must be requested prior to January 5, 2016

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. Richmont Graduate University is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. 

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychologist Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

NBCC Logo 2011                                                                                  APA Sponsor Low Res

Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Dialectical Behavior Therapy

Registration: click HERE

Richmont is opening a portion of this course to Richmont alumni and the surrounding community for Continuing Education Credit. This event is not sponsored by the alumni association and does not fall under the benefits of founding membership status.

When: January 5, 2016, 9:00am – 5:00pm (lunch on your own 12:00-1:30)

Where: Richmont Graduate University

                 1815 McCallie Avenue

                 Chattanooga, TN 37404

Continuing Education: 6.5 NBCC-approved CE Clock hours Awarded. 6.5 approved CE Clock Hours Awarded to Psychologists.

Fees: $100.00

 Presenter: Erica Skidmore, Psy.D

Topic: The purpose of this introductory course is to develop individuals’ knowledge and skill in Dialectical Behavior Therapy with applications to individual and group mental health counseling. Participants examine theoretical foundations, research findings, basic principles, and the intervention strategies of Dialectical Behavior Therapy with emphasis on group skills’ training. Emphasis is also placed on studying Borderline Personality Disorder with particular attention paid to theories of etiology and development. Strategies for applying a Christian theological framework to the theories of this approach and application of skills in counseling will also be discussed.

Learning Objectives: As a result of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss a basic developmental framework for understanding the etiology of Borderline Personality Disorder, along with the DSM-IV-TR criteria and other characteristics of this disorder.
  • Explain the empirically-validated uses of Dialectical Behavior Therapy across a variety of settings and diagnoses.
  • Demonstrate skills in applying the theories and techniques of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in the therapeutic setting.
  • Apply the 4 Skills Training Modules of Dialectical Behavior Therapy to their own clinical work.

Registration: Click HERE

 

Please direct your questions regarding this seminar to Autumn Stephenson at astephenson@richmont.edu.

Refunds must be requested prior to January 5, 2016.

Richmont Graduate University has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 4534. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identifited. RGU is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs.

Richmont Graduate University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Richmont Graduate University maintains responsibility for this program and its content.